Thursday, January 02, 2014

The Girl in the Red Coat - original oil pastel portrait painting

Finally back from vacation - hope everyone had a great New Year's - and ate their blackeyed peas!  At least, that's what we eat in the South on the first day of the year and I wouldn't dare do otherwise.  Who knows what could happen!  This painting is really a memory painting of a young woman leaving a cafĂ© where I was in late December and she seemed in a reflective mood.  Maybe she was thinking of her resolutions for the new year.  Or maybe nothing that dramatic, but I did love the scene and couldn't wait to record it when I got back to my studio.  It's on dark green Pastelbord, 5 x 7".  Thanks for stopping by - Happy New Year!

5 comments:

Lucy Chen said...

Happy New Year, Connie! Really happy to see you and your new oil pastel portrait. Wish you a very creative 2014!

Kami said...

Hi, I love your works especially the oil pastel ones... May be it's a stupid question, but what kind of pastels do you use to be able to make so fine, detailed paintings with it... I find oil pastels too soft and not sharped enough to do it your way...Do you use some special sharpening technique?Or some special pastels? Thanks a lot.
Kami

Connie said...

Hi Kami - thank you for your comment. I do have sharpeners for oil pastel by Derwent I think (pictured on my oil pastel blog), but actually I very rarely ever use them. I mostly use Senneliers - with some Caran d'Ache. I use whatever part of the crayon isn't blunted too much by use if I need to make a line. The reason I love Sennelier is that you can build up a lot of layers with it. I don't worry about perfection in getting lines just right, but the overall look. The casual approach, I guess.

Connie said...

Hi Lucy and Happy 2014 - so nice to hear from you! Will see you on your blog!

Robert said...

'The Girl in the Red Coat' looks everything you made her. Walking away from a life or preparing to face the bad weather outside. A moment sooner and you would have caught her pulling her collar up as high as it would go.